Here Are Some Ways to Say Moon in Different Languages

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The moon is an earth satellite with the fifth largest orbiting around it. It has been said to be 4 billion years old, and its name comes from Middle English “moon” which means month in the Latin language after being borrowed by English speakers during colonial times when they needed names for moons of different stages so that sailors could know what time their voyage would end at nightfall without needing navigation equipment or knowing where land was located just offshore because explorer had not yet mapped entire planet.

Moon Word in All Languages:

The word Moon has been translated into over 100 languages around the world.

Different Languages Word Moon
Albanian hënë
Basque ilargia
Belarusian месяц
Bosnian mjesec
Bulgarian луна
Catalan lluna
Croatian mjesec
Czech měsíc
Danish måne
Dutch maan
Estonian Kuu
Finnish kuu
French lune
Galician lúa
German Mond
Greek φεγγάρι (fengári)
Hungarian hold
Icelandic Tungl
Irish moon
Italian Luna
Latvian mēness
Lithuanian mėnulis
Macedonian месечината
Maltese qamar
Norwegian måne
Polish księżyc
Portuguese lua
Romanian lună
Russian Луна (Luna)
Serbian месец (mesec)
Slovak mesiac
Slovenia luna
Spanish Luna
Swedish måne
Ukrainian місяць (misyats’)
Welsh lleuad
Yiddish לעוואָנע
Armenian լուսին
Azerbaijani ay
Bengali চাঁদ
Chinese Simplified 月亮 (yuèliàng)
Chinese Traditional 月亮 (yuèliàng)
Georgian მთვარე
Gujarati ચંદ્ર
Hindi चांद
Hmong hli
Japanese
Kannada ಚಂದ್ರನ
Kazakh ай
Khmer ព្រះ​ច័ន្ទ
Korean 달 (dal)
Lao ເດືອນ
Malayalam ചന്ദ്രൻ
Marathi चंद्र
Mongolian сар
Myanmar (Burmese)
Nepali चन्द्र
Sinhala සඳ
Tajik моҳ
Tamil சந்திரன்
Telugu చంద్రుడు
Telugu చంద్రుడు
Thai ดวงจันทร์
Turkish ay
Urdu چاند
Uzbek oy
Vietnamese mặt trăng
Arabic القمر (alqamar)
Hebrew ירח
Persian ماه
Afrikaans maan
Chichewa mwezi
Hausa watã
Igbo ọnwa
Sesotho khoeli
Somali moon
Swahili mwezi
Yoruba oṣupa
Zulu inyanga
Cebuano bulan
Filipino buwan
Indonesian buwan
Javanese buwan
Malagasy volana
Malay volana
Maori marama
Esperanto luno
Haitian Creole lalin
Latin luna

Moon in Asian Languages:

Moon translated into almost 36 Asian languages.

Different Languages Word Moon
Armenian լուսին
Azerbaijani ay
Bengali চাঁদ
Chinese Simplified 月亮 [yuèliàng]
Chinese Traditional 月亮 [yuèliàng]
Georgian მთვარე
Gujarati ચંદ્ર
Hindi चांद
Hmong hli
Japanese
Kannada ಚಂದ್ರನ
Kazakh ай
Khmer ព្រះ​ច័ន្ទ
Korean 달 [dal]
Kyrgyz ай
Lao ເດືອນ
Malayalam ചന്ദ്രൻ
Marathi चंद्र
Mongolian сар
Myanmar (Burmese)
Nepali चन्द्र
Odia ଚନ୍ଦ୍ର
Pashto سپوږمۍ
Punjabi ਚੰਦ
Sindhi چنڊ
Sinhala සඳ
Tajik моҳ
Tamil சந்திரன்
Telugu చంద్రుడు
Thai ดวงจันทร์
Turkish ay
Turkmen
Urdu چاند
Uyghur ئاي
Uzbek oy
Vietnamese mặt trăng

 

Moon in Middle East Languages:

A translation of Moon into four languages of the middle east.

Different Languages Word Moon
Arabic القمر [alqamar]
Hebrew ירח
Kurdish (Kurmanji) hêv
Persian ماه

Moon in Other Foreign Languages:

Different Languages Word Moon
Esperanto luno
Haitian Creole lalin
Latin luna

Moon in Austronesian Languages:

Different Languages Word Moon
Cebuano bulan
Filipino buwan
Hawaiian mahina
Indonesian bulan
Javanese rembulan
Malagasy volana
Malay bulan
Maori marama
Samoan masina
Sundanese bulan

Here is more information about the Moon:

The word “moon” came from a Latin word meaning “luna” which was used in ancient times. The moon has many different names, starting with Roman- Selene and Greek goddesses like Athena who gave it lightly due to its brightness not being actual sunlight but rather an effect on earth caused by the reflection of solar rays; then there were several others that had nicknames given such as Phobos (terror) or Hybris(vanity). It’s true what they say – you can’t see stars without darkness!

Also, Read About How to Say Black in Different Languages

The gravitational forces between Earth and the moon cause interesting effects. One of which is tides, as seen in oceans (and other bodies like lakes). The higher the level of water becomes due to their movement around a gravity-induced curve during this time period because there’s more material hitting it per square inch; then suddenly those same levels will drop again when they’re pulled back down into deep waters by another set amount after all that energy has been used for electricity production!

The nature behind these tidal exchanges isn’t just an amazing natural phenomenon but also totally vital – we rely on them daily without ever knowing how much really depends upon our ability not only to see what goes up or come down here each day.

You may have heard the saying “the Moon is a stone in someone’s shoe.” This couldn’t be any more true than when we discover its connection with water and ice. The South Pole of our nearest celestial body, which has no atmosphere to speak off but still contains evidence suggesting watery depths below its surface – this could mean life on another planet!

A lot goes down the moon: lots and lots of astronomical events take place during each month when you’re up there watching over us Earthlings; after all that spinning around every two days (27x) where does all that energy go? Well, it shoots towards outer space just like everything else electromagnetic radiation comes out shining brightly from behind your shadowed feet as soon.